Tag Archives: Sally Goldenbaum

An [unusual] day in the Life of Cass Halloran by Sally Goldenbaum

That Saturday began like many of them did: breakfast with Danny at Annabelle’s, a trip down to the dock to check on a shipment of new lobster traps, a couple of afternoon hours spent in the Halloran Lobster Co. office catching up on paperwork. Boring but predictable.

But it was in the office that things started going south. The commercial washing machine in the warehouse broke down, leaving a pile of vile smelling nets and towels and sweatshirts, things I couldn’t let sit there until the cleaning crew came in Monday.

So I locked up and headed to the Harbor Road Laundromat, dumped my load and ran a boatload of Saturday errands, including a drink with Danny on the Artists’ Palette deck where he was working on a book. Later—after the wet ocean winds had turned unusually cold for September—I went back to pick up my laundry. The place was empty, the florescent lights stark and creating ominous shadows in odd places. Outside the wind howled and branches slapped against the windows. Spooky.

And that’s when things took a turn, one that would keep me awake that night. And maybe two or three or four other nights.

Mixed in with my smelly load were some kids’ things: a fuzzy pink sweater, a pair of boy’s jeans, a uniform skirt, and other pieces of clothing that made the fishermen sweats look like clothes for giants. At first it didn’t set off any alarms. A busy mom short on change had snuck some of her load in while I was out getting coffee. Not a big deal. I’d done it myself. Certainly not spooky.

The clothes were still damp so I shoved them back in, added a coin, and sat across the room. Waiting.

It was when the door opened awhile later, bringing in gusts of cold wind that my antennae went up. There was no busy mom in sight.

I spotted the dog first. He headed straight for my dryer. He was joined by a young boy—9 or 10 maybe—who opened the dryer door and was soon elbow deep, rummaging through the clothes with the help of his buddy.

I glanced toward the entrance, waiting for an adult to follow, but the door had already slammed shut. Outside, the dark street was empty. No mom or dad waiting in a car at the curb, and only an old bike balanced haphazardly against the window.

The boy’s head jerked up when he saw me, but before I could tell him it was all okay— that I was cool with him using my dryer—he’d stuffed some of the clothes in an old back pack and raced toward the door. By the time I reached it, he’d jumped on the bike, headed down the street and in minutes was swallowed up by the rainy black night, the dog just a wheel-length behind him.

Back inside, on the floor, were the abandoned pieces he’d first pulled from the dryer.

And inside me was a fear that something was horribly wrong. Maybe it was instinct— the strong, troubling kind that stays with you, even when you’re having a good time. But even I couldn’t have predicted what would follow that night. There was no way I could have imagined that that mixture of fear and worry for a skinny kid and his dog would tear Nell, Izzy, Birdie, and me away from our lazy Sea Harbor life and toss us into a dizzying world of murder.

But it did.


You can read more about Cass in Murder Wears Mittens, the first book in the newly named “Seaside Knitters Society” mystery series, coming August 29, 2017.

As autumn washes over coastal Sea Harbor, Massachusetts, the Seaside Knitters anticipate a relaxing off-season. But when murder shatters the peace, the craftiest bunch in town must unravel a killer’s deadly scheme . . .

After retrieving fresh lobster nets from a local Laundromat, Cass Halloran rushes to attend a last-minute gathering with her knitting circle. But Cass can’t stop worrying about the lonely boy seen hanging around the dryers, and the school uniform he left behind in a hurry. When the ladies return the lost clothing the next day, they find the child and his younger sister alone, seemingly abandoned by their mother . . .

The knitters intend to facilitate a family reunion, not investigate a crime. But the death of Dolores Cardozo, a recluse from the edge of town, throws the group for a loop. Especially when the missing mother and one of their own become tied to the victim’s hidden fortune—and her murder . . .

Before scandalous secrets break bonds and rumors tear Sea Harbor apart, the Seaside Knitters need to string together the truth about Dolores—while preventing a greedy murderer from making another move!

* Includes a knitting pattern *

Pre-Order Link

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About the author
Sally Goldenbaum is the author of over thirty published novels. Murder Wears Mittens is the newest in the best selling Seaside Knitters Society Mysteries. She divides her time between land-locked Kansas and a small condo on a Cape Ann harbor (Gloucester MA), home of her Sea Harbor fictional friends.

To learn more about her, visit her website at sallygoldenbaum.com or join the chatter on her Facebook page.

All comments are welcomed.

A Day in the Life of Birdie Favazza by Sally Goldenbaum

Murder at Lambswool FarmI know, you’re surprised. I am too. You know and I know that my cook Ella only allows me in the kitchen for conversation. But here I am, proud owner of this place—Lambswool Farm. A farm that serves meals, would you believe that? It’s an amazing place. Magnificent.

Coming out here is the perfect cure for the unsettling feelings lurking around Sea Harbor these days.

The farm renovation wasn’t entirely my idea. I remembered the old Favazza farm as a spot to sit in my Sonny’s Lincoln convertible beneath a full moon, cuddly and cozy. Making out, we used to call it those millions of years ago.

houseBut then something peculiar happened. The rolling fields and broken down barns rose up and called out one day, begging me to bring them back to life. So I did. Well, we did.

Once my granddaughter Gabby saw this place—she’s the deer-like creature out there right now, racing through the fields—she began planning how many sheep we needed. Cats came next (and there’s a pony on the list).

Next a gardener friend begged to dig her fingers into the soil. She’d enrich it and create the finest organic garden on the North Shore, she said. And Claire did exactly that.

And then my lovely friend Nell, who sometimes fancies herself as Sea Harbor’s Barefoot Contessa, suggested we turn one of the barns into a state of the art kitchen. ‘Plated dinners at sunset,’ she said, “using organic vegies from Claire’s garden. “Fresh fish from the sea.” I groaned. But it was a happy groan.

tableAnd before you knew it, area chefs were clamoring to host the dinners at Lambswool Farm.

Planning for the first farm dinner is a great distraction from the strange things happening in town: a fine young man losing a job, a beloved family doctor acting strangely, a stranger coming through town—and not leaving.

But we’ve pushed the bad vibes away. In just a few days we’ll hold the first dinner—a rehearsal, I call it. Just invited friends and family to help us work out all the kinks.

“We’re probably imagining the unrest in town,” I told Nell this morning. “It’s just slight nervousness about the dinner.”

But Nell said no. “This beautiful place can’t be responsible for the unsettling feeling gripping Sea Harbor,” she said.

Cass, our lobster fisherwoman friend, agreed. She blames the bad vibes on the tourist passing through town. A pleasant man, in my opinion. I told Cass she’s been banding lobsters too long. She expects to be pinched.

But Nell agreed with her. There’s something about him, she said. Something I can’t put my finger on . . .

Something about him? Nonsense. He fixed my new John Deer tractor, after all.

To prove them all wrong, I’ve invited Glenn—that’s his name— to the dinner on Sunday.

Wine and delicious food, music. Friends soaking in the magic of Lambswool Farm at sunset. It will be a perfectly lovely time. How could it not be?

There are plenty of reasons, a voice in my head says. But I am dismissing it, right now. . .


Murder at Lambswool Farm is the 11th book in the Seaside Knitters mystery series, published by Penguin, May 2016.

Late summer blooms in beautiful Sea Harbor, Massachusetts, and while a harvest thrives, Izzy Chambers Perry and the other Seaside Knitters will need to cast on their sleuthing skills to save a local farm. Unfortunately, finding a killer can be like looking for a needle in a haystack. . . .

Seaside Knitter Birdie Favazza has long loved knitting, but lately she’s taken on a new challenge—making a family farm operational again. With help from friends, Lambswool Farm is now up and running, with thriving crops and grazing sheep. In addition, the farm will host rustic, six-course prix fixe dinners plated by local chefs and served on a gorgeous restored harvest table, decorated to perfection with colorful knitted vegetables crafted by Izzy Chambers Perry, her aunt Nell, and the other Seaside Knitters.

But on the night of the first meal, everything spins out of control when one of the guests, Seaside Harbor’s family physician, becomes fatally ill. It seems that behind Dr. Alan Hamilton’s friendly bedside manner was a man with enemies and secrets.

Soon the town is gossiping and pointing fingers at all possible suspects—including the women at Lambswool Farm. Now the Seaside Knitters must join together to uncover the truth in Dr. Hamilton’s complicated past—and restore peace to town and country alike.

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About the author
Sally Goldenbaum writes the Seaside Knitters Mystery Series, set on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, an area she visits every chance she gets. Murder at Lambswool Farm, the newest in the series, is now available in hardcover, and the 9th book in the series, A Finely Knit Murder is available for the first time in paperback. Connect with Sally at sallygoldenbaum.com.

Giveaway: Leave comment below for your chance to win a print copy of A Finely Knit Murder. US entries only, please. The giveaway will end May 13, 2016 at 12 AM EST. Good luck everyone!

All comments are welcomed.

My Musing ~ Murder at Lambswool Farm by Sally Goldenbaum

Murder at Lambswool Farm by Sally Goldenbaum is the 11th book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series. Publisher: May 2016

Murder at Lambswool FarmLate summer blooms in beautiful Sea Harbor, Massachusetts, and while a harvest thrives, Izzy Chambers Perry and the other Seaside Knitters will need to cast on their sleuthing skills to save a local farm. Unfortunately, finding a killer can be like looking for a needle in a haystack. . . .

Seaside Knitter Birdie Favazza has long loved knitting, but lately she’s taken on a new challenge—making a family farm operational again. With help from friends, Lambswool Farm is now up and running, with thriving crops and grazing sheep. In addition, the farm will host rustic, six-course prix fixe dinners plated by local chefs and served on a gorgeous restored harvest table, decorated to perfection with colorful knitted vegetables crafted by Izzy Chambers Perry, her aunt Nell, and the other Seaside Knitters.

But on the night of the first meal, everything spins out of control when one of the guests, Seaside Harbor’s family physician, becomes fatally ill. It seems that behind Dr. Alan Hamilton’s friendly bedside manner was a man with enemies and secrets.

Soon the town is gossiping and pointing fingers at all possible suspects—including the women at Lambswool Farm. Now the Seaside Knitters must join together to uncover the truth in Dr. Hamilton’s complicated past—and restore peace to town and country alike.

This drama embodies New England charm with a comfortable tone that warms the essence of the pleasantries of life. A new guy in town brings murder and with the Seaside Knitters doing the untangling, all the pieces fall into place and a killer is exposed. Every time I read a book by Sally, her story pulls me in with the friendly atmosphere and the lovable residents of Sea Harbor, Massachusetts. The writing is expertly done and the easy pace makes for a wonderful read. The author does a great job of telling a story that had plenty of suspect with some twisty turns that truly enhanced how this all plays out in the end. This was a great read and as always I can’t wait for my next visit with Nell, Izzy, Ben and the rest of the gang.

A Day in the Life of Charlie Chambers by Sally Goldenbaum

Trimmed With MurderIt was a day I won’t forget–ever.

I was driving along 128 toward Sea Harbor, thinking about my sister, and wondering if I was crazy. Rain had picked up and so had an icy wind. A great day for Eskimos. Not such a great day for Charlie.

Izzy was always the favorite in our family, at least that’s how my older brother Jack and I saw it. Maybe it’s because she didn’t screw up as often as we did. And then she went off to Harvard, which puffed my dad up until there wasn’t much air for anyone else in the room.

rainI thought of Izzy a lot while I was wandering around trying to find my soul. I wondered how her adult life had turned out. Better, for sure, than mine. Though I thought I was finally on the right track.

I guessed I’d find out soon, if she even remembered she had a younger brother, or at least one she’d want to see. I figured it was one of the worst ideas I’ve had in my thirty plus years, driving along a godforsaken road in terrible weather, showing up in a town I’ve never seen before. Unexpected. And with a good chance of being thrown out.

I almost turned back once or twice a ways back. Almost. But didn’t, and soon the exits stopped, the wind picked up and I was fighting like crazy to keep the car on the road. On all sides, trees were bending in the wind, their barren branches reaching out to grab me.

And that’s when it happened. At first I thought it was a tree moving out from the side of the road. But trees don’t have legs and this thing did. Skinny ones moving fast. And so was my car.

I slammed my foot on the pedal, the car vibrating like crazy. And all I could think of was that it was happening again. But it couldn’t be happening. . .not again. . .not now. Not today.

It was definitely a day I’ll never forget—a day that changed that changed my life forever.


You can read more about Charlie in Trimmed With Murder, the 10th book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series, published by Obsidian. The first book in the series is Death by Cashmere.

GIVEAWAY: Leave a comment by 12 a.m. eastern on November 27 for your chance to win a print copy of TRIMMED WITH MURDER. (US entries only, please.) Good luck everyone!

About the author
Sally Goldenbaum is the USA best-selling author of the Seaside Knitters Mystery series. Although she lives in landlocked Kansas, she spends as much time as possible on Cape Ann, MA, a very real and beautiful place that is also home to the fictional Sea Harbor, the seaside knitters, and their many friends. Murder at Lambswool Farm, #11, will be released May, 2016.

Visit Sally at www.sallygoldenbaum.com

My Musing ~ A Finely Knit Murder by Sally Goldenbaum

A Finely Knit MurderA Finely Knit Murder by Sally Goldenbaum is the 9th book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series. Publisher: Obsidian, May 2015

Readers can’t help but get entangled in this USA Today bestselling series.

In the newest mystery from the national bestselling author of Murder in Merino, the sleuthing skills of Izzy Chambers Perry and the Seaside Knitters are tested as death mars the beginning of the school year. . .

Seaside Knitter Birdie Favazza is thrilled that her granddaughter Gabby will be visiting for the fall and attending the Sea Harbor Community Day School. Gabby loves the school, with its newly-adopted progressive curriculum, and she loves that the Seaside Knitters are teaching knitting as part of the enrichment program. It’s a huge success, and on crisp autumn days, girls camp out on the terraces, knitting up hats for charity.

But not everyone is happy with the direction the school is taking. Outspoken board member Blythe Westerland has sparked tempers with her determination to unravel the current administration. Then, on the evening of an elegant school event, Blythe’s body is found near the school boathouse.

With a killer on the loose, Birdie is determined to keep Gabby safe. Working together, the Seaside Knitters carefully unravel the layers of Blythe’s complicated life, bringing faculty members and town residents under scrutiny. Before the cast-off rows are made on the students’ projects, the knitters will need to stitch together the evidence to see if a murderer has been walking beside them all along.

This series continues to get better and better with each book written. I love the comfortable tone and how easily this book flows from chapter to chapter from scene to scene blending it all together to create a mystery that kept grabbed me immediately. The addition of Gabby is purely a delight and I like how she brings sunshine to these stories. What I enjoy best when reading this light and airy whodunit is the camaraderie between this ensemble cast that bridges the age gap from pre-teen to octogenarian. I’m so mesmerized by the verbiage, the interactions, the feel-good atmosphere and the sense of friendship I feel as I read about the lives of the residents of Sea Harbor. This was a great read and I was not prepared for the flood of emotions reading the last chapter in this delightfully, heartwarming and charming tale. I can’t wait to see where we go next with my Izzy, Nell, Cass, Birdie and the rest of the gang in this well-written and wonderfully crafted series.

A Day in the Life of Elizabeth Hartley by Sally Goldenbaum

A Finely Knit MurderIt was a wonderful day. Until it wasn’t.

But as head mistress of an amazing girls’ school in Sea Harbor—an old stone mansion that overlooked the sea—one had to expect some bumps, right? But all bumps aren’t created equal, I discovered one day.

My office overlooks the ocean, and it almost always brings peace and comfort to my life. Almost always.

But this day I had just fired a teacher—a good teacher, but one who had offended a powerful board member. The art teacher took losing his job badly.

After Josh left, slamming my office door so hard the framed photo of the captain who used to live in the mansion that now housed my school, almost fell on his stern, bearded face, I walked to my window, seeking the view that usually brought peace to my soul.

But today, this is what I saw instead:

My fired artist strolling across the rolling green lawn, spraying the grass with canary yellow paint—the color of crime scene tape—in wild flying circles. And in the center of one of the fuzzy circles he added a unique and frightening touch—it reminded me of a road sign—a stick figure of a woman with a line slashed through her.

I should have seen the omen that day for what it was: a harbinger of the days that would follow. Some of the most difficult of my life. Days that were a roller coaster ride that dipped down to its lowest the evening of a magnificent party on the lawns and terraces of my school, an evening that ended with a body being found near our old boathouse—the body of a person who hated me.

Walking away would have been an option, but I had been gifted with my dream job, working every day in a magnificent mansion straight out of Jane Eyre. One filled with the high chatter and spinning laughter of young girls with bright inquisitive minds.

Somehow that omen would lift me up again, I knew it had to.

And with the help of four amazing women who taught my students the gifts that knitting brings to one’s soul, and, on the side, taught a headmistress how to live and fall in love with a tiny seaside town—it did.


You can read more about Elizabeth in A Finely Knit Murder, the 10th book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series, published by Obsidian. The first book in the series is Death by Cashmere.

GIVEAWAY: Leave a comment by 12 a.m. eastern on May 26 for the chance to win a copy of A Finely Knit Murder. The giveaway is open to U.S. residents only. Winner will be notified within 48 hours after giveaway closes and you will have three days to respond after being contacted or another winner will be selected. Make sure to check your SPAM folder.

About the author
Sally Goldenbaum is the author of three dozen novels, most recently the Seaside Knitters Mystery Series, set in Sea Harbor, Massachusetts. A Finely Knit Murder, the newest in the series, is now available in hardcover, and the 9th book, Murder in Merino is now available for the first time in paperback. Sally lives in Prairie Village, Kansas, but spends as much time as possible on Cape Ann, MA, cavorting with the seaside knitters (and her family). Visit Sally at www.sallygoldenbaum.com.

Murder in Merino by Sally Goldenbaum

Murder In MerinoMurder in Merino by Sally Goldenbaum is the 8th book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series. Publisher: Obsidian, May 2014

It’s autumn in Sea Harbor, and as the tourists leave, a mysterious guest arrives. When she’s implicated in a crime, the Seaside Knitters must quickly table their knitting project and search out a motif for murder.

Fall is usually a relaxing time in Sea Harbor, but it’s turning out to be a busy season for Izzy Chambers Perry. Not only is she helping the Seaside Knitters make a magnificent throw to celebrate the fortieth wedding anniversary of her aunt and uncle, but she and her husband are finally selling the cottage she lived in before she got married and had a darling baby girl. To Izzy’s surprise, newcomer Julia Ainsley seems determined to buy the home—although she’s never set foot inside.

But on the day of the open house, things take a dark turn. A body is uncovered in the cottage’s backyard. When the police find Julia’s name and phone number in the victim’s pocket, this slender thread of evidence makes her a person of interest. Soon the spotlight of suspicion widens to include old friends and town leaders as a tragic happening, long buried in the sleepy seaside town, is slowly brought to the surface.

Before the joyful anniversary celebration can be realized, the Seaside Knitters must work to unravel the real reason Julia Ainsley has come to their town—and the tangled and troubled ties from the past that bind friends and townsfolk together.

As always, the author transports me to Sea Harbor in this character-driven drama with her wonderfully creative storyline that leaves me hungry for more time with Nell, Izzy, Cass, Ben and the rest of the gang. A stranger arrives, a murder with close ties to the past and a secret long buried threatens their harmony that is until the Seaside Knitters jump right into an investigation that will either close or open a door for some of the residents. I love the comfortable tone in this evenly paced whodunit that boasts good conversations and a feel good atmosphere. I’m looking forward to the next chapter in the lives of Nell and her friends in this delightfully charming series.

A Day in the Life of Jules Ainsley by Sally Goldenbaum

Murder In MerinoIt looks like a seaside cottage—probably a hundred years old—and has to be the friendliest looking shop I’ve ever seen.

The front window is filled with amazing yarn, some draped over branches, some floating on a pile of autumn leaves. The whole thing teasing, coaxing, beckoning you to come inside. And to make it perfect, there’s a cat sitting on top of a pile of ruby red merino yarn. As I soak in the luscious yarn, she stands up, stretches, and stares at me through the window.

catyarnWhat is that sweet calico kitten seeing? A flushed woman in running shorts, her tee-shirt rimmed with sweat, dots of perspiration lining her brow and a Chicago Cubs’ hat working overtime to keep a mass of dark hair in place? Not a pretty sight to a cat, no doubt. I smile at her—the cat—and I swear she smiles back. An invitation to come in?

Several women pass me by, talking yarn and needles, and push open the green door. Without a second thought, I follow.

A woman with streaked blonde hair and perfect bones walks toward me from behind the counter. “I’m Izzy Perry,” she says. “Welcome to the Seaside Yarn Studio.”

skein“Julia,” I say, my eyes now taking in walls lined from floor to ceiling with cubicles holding every kind of fiber imaginable. I finally look back into her smile and return it. “Friends call me Jules.”

“Yes, I know. Jules Ainsley.” Then she warms her words with a gusty laugh that floats all the way up to the tin ceiling.

“I guess in a small town…” I begin, trying to explain how she knows my name.

“Yes,” she says. “No secrets in small towns. Sea Harbor gossip tells me you’re staying at Mary Pisano’s B&B. And Mary loves having you. She’s intent on keeping you here as long as possible, so be aware of that. Are you having a good time in our town?”

“Good time?” I try not to show surprise at the question. I haven’t come for a good time, not really. “It’s a great little town,” I say carefully.

I can tell there are questions hidden politely in Izzy’s words. Am I a tourist. A visitor or someone’s relative? Or on vacation—here for a few days, a week of fun.

What will I say if she presses me further?

But she changes the subject, perhaps sensing my discomfort. “You’re a knitter,” she says. “I can see it in your eyes. And you’re clearly a runner. I hear you have pretty much toured our entire cape on foot.”

“I’m a little obsessed. It’s the best way to see a town, to discover what makes it special. And it helps me sleep.”

Izzy agrees. She’s a runner too, she says, and suggests a new route I might want to explore. “It meanders along the beach and eventually you’ll find your way back to Ravenswood by the Sea and Mary’s famous lemon mint iced tea.”

I feel the need to run a few more miles so thank her for the suggestion, mentally recording the directions and promising aloud to return to the shop later to spend a healthy portion of my life’s savings on some of her luscious yarns.

As directed, I run down Harbor Road, then detour east along the access road to a stretch of beach as smooth and silky as some of the yarn I’d coveted in Izzy’s shop. How had I missed this spot? It was perfect for the time of day. In seconds the sounds of the sea are filling my mind and lifting my spirit.

No secrets in this town, Izzy had said. It had simply been a conversation piece—one you toss out without thought.

Izzy was wrong. There are secrets here. Every town has secrets. And especially Sea Harbor, at least in my mind—and in my heart.

I pick up my pace, waving to a ruddy-faced fisherman pushing his boat off shore, and close my eyes, letting the wind whip my hair against my cheeks, the salty spray stinging my bare arms and legs.

beachWhen I open my eyes again, I’m nearly at the end of the beach. A pile of granite boulders is strewn haphazardly into the sea, bringing the stretch of beach to an end. To my left a narrow road meanders up a low hill, bordered by a jungle of unkempt bushes and trees that anchor the hill’s soil. I head up the road, noticing a line of houses on the side, their roofs peeking out above the trees and bushes.

And then I stop.

Suddenly.

Frozen in place. A car honks, urging me to the side.

I walk to the edge of the road, staring up at the houses. No. Staring at one house. I stand there forever, my mind digging into the past.

And the present.

And then I know with utter certainty that Izzy Perry is wrong. Sea Harbor does have secrets.

And I am about to uncover one of them.

One that may change my life forever.

When Jules Ainsley is implicated in the murderer of a well-loved bartender in Murder in Merino, the seaside knitters temporarily put aside the planning of Nell and Ben’s fortieth anniversary party to find the truth behind the murder that shakes the whole town. In their search, Nell, Birdie, Cass, and Izzy spare no one—not neighbors or friends, not visitors or shopkeepers—as they probe into a past long buried, seeking a murderer who may be walking right alongside them on Harbor Road.


You can read more about Jules in Murder in Merino, the eighth book in the “Seaside Knitters” mystery series, published by Penguin. The first book in the series is Death by Cashmere. Books are available at retail and online booksellers.

GIVEAWAY
Comment on this post by 6 p.m. EST on May 8, and you will be entered for a chance to win a copy of MURDER IN MERINO or ANGORA ALIBI. Two winners will be chosen at random. Unless specified, U.S. entries only.

Meet the author
Sally Goldenbaum is a sometime philosophy teacher, a knitter, and an editor, and the author of more than thirty sally-2novels. Sally became more serious about knitting with the creation of the Seaside Knitters mystery series and the birth of her first grandchild. Her fictional seaside friends are helping her probe the intricacies of women’s friendship, the mysteries, heartaches and joys of small-town living, and the very best way to pick up dropped stitches on a lacy knit shawl.

Website | Facebook


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Words From Nell Endicott by Sally Goldenbaum

Angora AlibiMy warm thanks to Dru for her gracious invitation to stop by and visit one of my favorite blog hosts and sites.

“People have babies every day.”

That was my husband Ben’s comment when I came down the back stairs that Saturday morning. He didn’t even turn around—he was standing over the coffee pot in our kitchen, willing it to stop wheezing and turn into a strong dark roast. And he felt my worry on his back.

Ben is wise and often right. But sometimes there are things that well up inside of a woman that a man can’t touch. Like the emotions surrounding my niece Izzy’s pregnancy that had a vice-like grip on me. With her parents almost 1500 miles away, I took my aunt role very seriously. Besides, Izzy was the daughter of my soul.

“Of course they do,” I had answered. “But … this is different.”

I took my coffee and walked out onto the deck. Some things are best not discussed. I knew that while Ben was right on a rational level. I was right on a completely different plane.

Izzy had been anxious that week, even when doing what she loved—Being with friends and working with her customers and the luxurious yarns that arrived weekly in her shop, the Sea Harbor Yarn Studio (which Ben often referred to as Izzy’s true firstborn).

Her husband Sam had noticed her unrest. I had noticed it. I think her doctor, Lily Virgilio had, too, because she had Izzy coming in for checkups more frequently than Rachel Wooten’s daughter, who was also due in a few weeks.

If the doctor could require frequent visits to assure her of Izzy’s progress, surely I could too. Izzy was as close to me as any daughter could ever be. So I pulled out my phone and called her, suggesting we go for a slow (very slow) jog before she headed to work. Izzy’s manager Mae had extra help on Saturday mornings and the exercise would be good for both of us, I told her. The day was perfect for it—cool enough to keep us moving but with a warming sun above and a calm sea beside us.

Izzy said “sure,” as I knew she would, because Izzy was an excellent judge of character—and she knew I needed it. Not the jog, but being with her and assuring myself that all was well.

But all wasn’t well.

Looking back, I should have seen the signs that day, the things that weren’t right. The things that spoke to Izzy’s emotions.

I should have noticed the tension in the clinic when we stopped to pick up Izzy’s vitamins on our way to the beach and heard Janie Levin, the wonderful obstetrics nurse we all loved, arguing with her cousin Justin and suggesting he shape up or drop off the edge of the world, words foreign to the usually mild-mannered nurse.

Most of all, maybe I should have noticed the infant car seat, sitting like a monument in the sand on Paley’s Cove when we jogged by. The car seat that Izzy had noticed, and that she’d been jogging by every day for nearly a week.

The infant carrier that never moved from the same spot and was there in the sand early in the morning before there was ever a mother or baby in sight. It was a lonely car seat that didn’t speak of babies at all.

All these things caused havoc with a young mother-to-be’s emotions.

They’re the things I should have noticed that day.

I didn’t. But I would soon enough because that day was simply a harbinger of things to come.

And though Izzy and I had a lovely slow jog that day, and I came home relieved and feeling somewhat better about Izzy’s state of mind, it was a day that would be turned on its head soon after when a young man we all knew was murdered during a scuba dive on that very beach, leaving behind him a circuitous trail that wound its way all around Sea Harbor, circling people we all loved.

In Angora Alibi, the seaside knitters follow that trail, uncovering town secrets until the murderer is finally found and peaceful days are restored to Sea Harbor— days suitable to joyously welcome the birth of a very special baby.


Sally is giving away one (1) copy of A FATAL FLEECE. Leave a comment to be included in the giveaway. Book will be shipped directly from the author. Contest ends May 23; US entries only.


Meet the author
Sally Goldenbaum, a former editor and philosophy instructor, is the author of more than thirty novels. Although she lives in land-locked Prairie Village, KS, she spends many days on Cape Ann (with its twenty-five miles of shoreline) where her Seaside Knitters mystery series is set. Angora Alibi is the seventh mystery in the series; the eighth will be published in May, 2014.

For book updates, random thoughts, and to say hello, please stop by her Facebook author page and her website.

Books are available at retail and online booksellers.