Tag Archives: Larissa Reinhart

Cover Reveal ~ A Composition in Murder by Larissa Reinhart

I’m so excited to once again reveal the cover for the next book in the “Cherry Tucker” mystery series.

A Composition in Murder

Cherry Tucker’s sixth full novel, A Composition in Murder, launches November 15, 2016. With a short story in a Halloween anthology coming this fall, that will make eight Cherry Tucker stories (six books, 2 novellas) in four years. What an exciting ride it’s been and it’s all due to my readers. Thank you! I feel so privileged to share the cover with y’all, particularly on dru’s book musings. I feel like I’ve gotten to know so many of you over the last four years and I’m feeling sentimental doing this once again!

In A Composition in Murder, when Cherry Tucker volunteers to teach art at Halo’s poshest independent living home, Halo House, she’s trying her best to stay out of trouble. However, what can a nosy girl do when Halo House’s most famous resident Belvia Brakeman, the ninety-year-old CEO of Meemaw’s Tea, confides in Cherry that the family tea empire is in jeopardy and asks for help? Belvia suspects her daughter, the COO, has been murdered and she might be next. Cherry once again finds herself involved in a hometown whodunit, where the secret recipe for tea might just involve poison.

I chose a posh senior residency for the setting in Cherry’s sixth caper because growing up in a small town, I knew more elderly people than kids my own age. I grew up listening to small town stories at my Nana’s, my next door neighbor, and from other folks in my hometown. My Grandpa Bun was a master storyteller. But the best stories came from asking questions. You learn a lot about history, psychology, and storytelling when you ask your elders about their past.

Fair warning, A Composition in Murder is no story where the seniors are sick, feeble, and helpless. They’re not even that sweet. In fact, at Halo House, Cherry finds the friendly rapport of likeminded people she’s missed since college. She also finds that older doesn’t always mean wiser. Nor does it mean innocent.

Here’s a sneak peek from a scene at Halo House’s bar, the Last Call, to make my point.

The Last Call looked like a typical hotel bar. Adjoined to Halo House’s fine dining space, the bar and restaurant were open to the public, although neither were advertised in the local phone directory under “Eating Establishments.” Halo House also had a twenty-hour deli (open four a.m. to midnight), a pool bar, and room service.

“I am telling you,” I said, hopping on to a leather bar stool. “Halo House is something else. Always someone to talk to. Lots going on. Buses that take you anywhere you want to go. I just love it to death.”

“Don’t say that too loudly around here.” The bartender, a retirement-aged woman with frosted tips in her burgundy hair, had a surprisingly edgy north of the sweet tea line accent. She flashed a look around the walker and cane set, playing cards and chatting at the cocktail tables. “Or at least don’t shout it.”

She extended her hand. “I’m Rosie. You look familiar. Whose granddaughter are you?”

“I’m Cherry.” I shook her hand. “I’m Grandma Jo’s girl, but she isn’t here. Actually she passed ten years ago. Cancer.”

“So sorry. Had it myself and kicked its can in my fifties. I’m one of the lucky ones. What brings you to the Last Call?”

“Beer and company mostly. I’m teaching art here.”

“Right, you’re the painting lady. Heard that’s a popular class, although some are anxious to get to the good stuff.”

“Good stuff?” I considered the fundamentals I had covered. “We’ve done linear, one-point and two-point perspective. We’re working our way to line and plane variations using still life objects, but I thought they should master drapery to understand depth and shadow first. They’re probably anxious to get to the still lifes. Drawing cones and cubes can get tedious.”

“Sounds boring as hell, but I don’t do art.” Rosie pushed a beer toward me. “No, I’m talking about models.”

“Models? This is a fundamentals class, not a life drawing class.”

“Sweetheart, these ain’t the kind of folks who sign up for ‘Learn to Draw Tippy the Turtle’ in the back of a magazine. They like you well enough, but you’ve got to keep them interested.”

“They’re going to learn more than Tippy the Turtle in my class. Although if they are interested in illustration, I could adjust the course.” I floated a few pen and ink ideas around my brain as I sipped off my foam.

Rosie rolled her eyes. “There’s too much going on at Halo House. I heard there’s a hot yoga class starting. Those art students will drop you like a bad penny. They’ve got short attention spans when it comes to activities. Time’s precious here.”

My eyes widened. “I’ll lose my job. I can’t lose my job to something called hot yoga.”

“Don’t get all uppity with your art crap. I may be new to the area, but I’m a quick study. Just because these folks have money and a long history in the county, don’t mean they don’t want tacky titillation. They’ve lived a long time and they’re tired of minding their manners. They want a good time in their final years.”

“Making quality art is a good time.”

She poured a shot of bourbon in a wine glass and filled it with Diet Coke. “Let me show you something about quality in Halo House. People ’round here act snobbish at times, but money don’t buy good taste. Nor does it buy good sense.”

I leaned forward. I may draw the line between good and bad art, but I never drew a line when it came to hot gossip.

Rosie sipped on her cocktail and nodded toward a woman sitting in a corner by herself. She smiled and waved as people walked by, but seemed content to sit by herself and watch the scene. “That’s Eleanor.”

“She looks lonely.” I turned on my stool. “I should sit with her a bit.”

“She’s not lonely, she’s stoned out of her mind.”

“The poor thing. Is it her medication?”

Rosie chuckled. “Eleanor calls it medication. When I was growing up, we called it reefer.”

I swiveled around and almost knocked my beer over. “She’s high?”

“Not only does she roll her own, she grows her own.”

“What?”

“The community garden.”

A waiter strolled through the bar from the restaurant and deposited a basket of chips and a side of guacamole in front of Eleanor. She high-fived the waiter and dug into the chips.

“I wasn’t expecting that,” I admitted. “Grandma Jo was a strict Southern Baptist. She wouldn’t even try her sister’s homemade muscadine wine. Now Grandpa Ed has been known to dip from time to time and will drink a beer at a ball game, but that’s as far as he got on the controlled substance list.”

“Poor kid.” Rosie snorted. “Do you think your generation was the first to shock their parents? Just because you’re old, doesn’t mean you’re as straight-laced as your Granny. Hell, there’s plenty of baby boomers in Halo House. That should tell you something.”

I wasn’t sure what that was supposed to tell me, but I would give Rosie the benefit.

“What else is going on at Halo House?” I swung around on my stool to observe the crowd.

A couple had put some money in an old fashioned jukebox and were dancing to Tom Jones. Next to the jukebox a line of women had formed, some pointing out songs to their friends, others tapping their toes while they waited.

“That’s Two Dollar Frank,” said Rosie. “He’s one of our bachelors.”

“Two Dollar Frank?”

“Two bucks a dance. He makes mad money that way. And exercise to boot. He charges more for horizontal dancing, if you get my picture.”

“Good Lord. Halo House is like a college dorm. Where’s the keg hidden?”

Rosie smiled. “Now you’re getting the picture.”

Thanks so much Dru Ann for celebrating my cover reveal with me! To catch you up on the series before A Composition in Murder’s November release, I’d like to offer a Cherry Tucker Kindle or Nook e-book to one lucky commenter. Who was the senior in your life who told you the best stories of their past?


About the author
A 2015 Georgia Author of the Year Best Mystery finalist, Larissa writes the Cherry Tucker Mystery series. The first in the series, Portrait of a Dead Guy (2012), is a 2012 Daphne du Maurier finalist, 2012 The Emily finalist, and 2011 Dixie Kane Memorial winner. The sixth mystery, A Composition in Murder, is expected to release November 15, 2016. Her family and Cairn Terrier, Biscuit, now live in Nagoya, Japan, but still calls Georgia home. Visit her website, find her chatting on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Goodreads, or join her Facebook street team, The Mystery Minions.

Giveaway: Leave a comment below for your chance to win. The giveaway will end July 25, 2016 at 12 AM EST. Good luck everyone!

A Day in the Life with Cherry Tucker by Larissa Reinhart

The Body in the LandscapeThere’s not much that’s sadder than a grieving animal. Even goats, the orneriest of the animal kingdom, take a punch to the gut with grief. My Grandpa Ed had a goat who lost his beard and couldn’t stand to live without it. Literally.

But it’s dogs who’ll just break your heart with their sadness. Their little doggy eyes turn pitiful and the howls’ll just about kill you with their unbearable heartache. Then there’s the dogs who’ll keep working even while their tails are drooping and noses have become dry. They might be the most pitiful of all.

I’ve gotten to know one of these stoic, yet sorrowful dogs. Buckshot. She’s a Mountain Cur. A beautiful brindle bayer with soft ears. She’s doing her best to track a humongous side of pork for some ridiculous hunters at Big Rack Lodge.

I’m there to paint the winner’s portrait in Big Rack Lodge’s Hogzilla hunt contest. My buddy Max Avtaikin paid for my ticket. To be in his entourage, not to hunt. He’ll be side-by-side with the rich and famous of the hunting world, tracking the 1,000-plus-pound wild hog terrorizing the rural area of Swinton, Georgia.

But while the hunters are tracking Hogzilla, Buckshot and I are tracking her owner’s killer.

Abel wasn’t much in the human world, but in the dog world he was loved. Folks in Swinton called him sneaky. A gossip and a drunk. Not many would have much to do with Abel. He liked to listen in on private conversations, particularly when the jawing got loose at the Double Wide bar, due to the high percentage of shine in the local hootch.

If only Abel hadn’t also liked to use that information to cause trouble. Something a dog could forgive, but not so much humans.

Particularly the one that pushed Abel into a ravine.

The fact that I found Abel’s body while landscape painting on the eve of the big Hogzilla hunt makes me very suspicious. Found dead on property after meeting several of the hunters the night before.

Somebody (or bodies) are also leaving odd threats and causing dangerous pranks. The hunters say its protestors. There is a monster-loving nutjob running around here with half a bag of screws loose, sworn to save the giant Georgian hog. He doesn’t claim responsibility. However, I think it’s all related to Abel’s death. Buckshot likely does, too.

But don’t worry. Buckshot and I’ll take care of the threat hovering around Big Rack Lodge. And I’m not talking about Hogzilla.


You can read more about Cherry in The Body In The Landscape, the fifth book in the “Cherry Tucker” mystery series, published by Henery Press.

GIVEAWAY: Leave a comment by 12 a.m. eastern on December 18 for your chance to win a digital edition of your choice from the Cherry Tucker series (Portrait of a Dead Guy, Still Life in Brunswick Stew, Hijack in Abstract, Death in Perspective and The Body In The Landscape).  Good luck everyone!

About the author
A 2015 Georgia Author of the Year Best Mystery finalist, Larissa writes the Cherry Tucker Mystery series. The first in the series, Portrait Of A Dead Guy (2012), is a 2012 Daphne du Maurier finalist, 2012 The Emily finalist, and 2011 Dixie Kane Memorial winner. The fifth mystery, The Body In The Landscape, releases December 2015. Her family and Cairn Terrier, Biscuit, now live in Nagoya, Japan, but still call Georgia home. Visit her website, LarissaReinhart.com, find her chatting on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads, or join her Facebook street team, The Mystery Minions.

My Musing ~ The Body in the Landscape by Larissa Reinhart

The Body in the LandscapeThe Body in the Landscape by Larissa Reinhart is the fifth book in the “Cherry Tucker” humorous mystery series. Publisher: Henery Press, December 2015

When Cherry Tucker’s invited to paint the “kill portrait” for the winner of Big Rack Lodge’s Hogzilla hunt, it seems like a paid vacation. Back home in Halo, a Hatfield-McCoy-style standoff builds between Luke and Cherry’s families. She’s ready for a weekend away, hobnobbing with rich and famous hunters, where she can forget her troubles and nobody knows her name.

As Georgia sunshine turns to bleak December rain, Cherry’s R&R goes MIA when she finds a body in the woods. While the police believe the local drunk took an accidental spill, Cherry has her doubts, particularly when a series of malicious pranks are targeted at the rifle toting contestants. With loyal companions at her side—sort-of-ex-husband Todd and a championship bayer named Buckshot—Cherry tracks suspects through a forest full of pitfalls and perils. And all the while, a killer’s stalking the hunt party with a bead on Cherry.

This series continues to entertain me with the tenacity that is Cherry Tucker as the author’s narrative takes me on a dogged pursuit through the eyes and actions of our heroine who can’t abide by injustice, no matter how small. The drama pulled me in immediately with this quirkily cast of characters that kept me engaged in all that is happening from beginning to an ending that put a smile on my face. The author did a great job in setting up this mystery where each piece of the puzzle snapped together as the story moved forward with some interesting foray in the road map that is Cherry Tucker’s life. The author has created a character that belies ingenuity, grit, and vulnerability and one who has a heart of gold and a dazzling sense of being. This is one of my favorite books in the series and I can’t wait to see where we go next with the adventures of Cherry Tucker and the people of Halo, Georgia.

**I received an advance copy of this book from the author

Cover Reveal ~ The Body in the Landscape by Larissa Reinhart

The Body in the Landscape

The Body in the Landscape by Larissa Reinhart
Series: Cherry Tucker #5
Release Date: December 15, 2015
Website: larissareinhart.com

In The Body in the Landscape, Cherry Tucker’s escaping problems in Halo with a trip to the Big Rack hunting lodge to paint the winning “kill portrait” for a Hogzilla hunt contest. Between an accidental death and a serious of malicious pranks, Cherry fears the hunting party may be the prey for a vengeful stalker.

When Cherry Tucker’s invited to paint the “kill portrait” for the winner of Big Rack Lodge’s Hogzilla hunt, it seems like a paid vacation. Back home in Halo, a Hatfield-McCoy-style standoff builds between Luke and Cherry’s families. She’s ready for a weekend away, hobnobbing with rich and famous hunters, where she can forget her troubles and nobody knows her name.

As Georgia sunshine turns to bleak December rain, Cherry’s R&R goes MIA when she finds a body in the woods. While the police believe the local drunk took an accidental spill, Cherry has her doubts, particularly when a series of malicious pranks are targeted at the rifle toting contestants. With loyal companions at her side — sort-of-ex-husband Todd and a championship bayer named Buckshot — Cherry tracks suspects through a forest full of pitfalls and perils. And all the while, a killer’s stalking the hunt party with a bead on Cherry.

GIVEAWAY: Leave a comment by 12 a.m. eastern on July 16 for the chance to win a Kindle or Nook version of one of the Cherry Tucker books (Portrait of a Dead Guy, Still Life in Brunswick Stew, Hijack in Abstract, Death in Perspective) plus a swag and a special gift from Japan. The giveaway is open to everyone. Winner will be notified within 48 hours after giveaway closes and you will have three days to respond after being contacted or another winner will be selected.

Just Tai and Cherry Talkin’ by Tina Whittle and Larissa Reinhart

beer and wingsWhat happens when two mystery writers realize their characters are soul sisters? The writers make their characters meet, much like two friends forcing their children on a playdate. Both characters — gunshop owner Tai Randolph and the artist Cherry Tucker — are sassy, southern spitfires with a penchant for trouble and appetite for justice. After first clearing the scene of dangerous objects, like men and guns, the writers dropped their characters off at a bar and let them get to know each other.

The result: Just Tai and Cherry Talkin,’ two Georgia girls dishing on life with a side order of solving crimes. Get to know the amateur sleuths, Tai Randolph and Cherry Tucker, in Just Tai and Cherry Talkin,’ a free read available on Wattpad.

Red’s County Line Tap, found just across the tracks from the bitty town of Halo, could be mistaken from any number of tin roofed roadhouses wedged between Blue Law zoning restrictions in Georgia. Under the ownership of said Red, you’ll find the County Line has been renovated as a sports bar to attract Halo’s families, but on the weekend, the original juke joint vibe returns with the regular clientele of barflies, babes, and bikers. This particular drinking establishment has the added benefit of resting within stumbling distance of the artist Cherry Tucker’s home, the in-town Georgia bungalow of her deceased Great-Gam. And as Red serves the best hot wings and coldest beer in town, (along with plenty of unwanted advice), Cherry Tucker and her friends can usually be found at Red’s on any given weekend night. And Thursdays.

And the occasional Monday and Tuesday. And then there’s Wednesdays. . .

Tonight, Tai Randolph has found a seat at Red’s bar. As the owner of a Confederate gun shop in Kennesaw, Georgia, (which is a fair skip and hop from Halo), Tai has been told by customers from every corner of the metro Atlanta area that she needed to meet this Cherry Tucker person. She decided they might be right when she did a little bit of online research and saw Cherry’s name linked to not one, not two, but a whole mess of murders.

How about that? she thought. Another spitfire Southern blonde with a penchant for corpse-finding. She wondered what else she and Cherry might have in common besides an unfortunate affinity for trouble. So without further ado, Tai locked up the gun shop and pointed her Camaro toward Halo, where she pulled up a barstool next to the one and only Cherry Tucker.

Read on (for free) on Wattpad for more conversation with Tai and Cherry.

Deeper Than the GraveTina Whittle’s Tai Randolph/Trey Seaver series — featuring intrepid gunshop owner Tai and her corporate security agent partner Trey — has garnered starred reviews in Kirkus, Publisher’s Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal. Published by Poisoned Pen Press, this Atlanta-based series debuted with The Dangerous Edge of Things, followed by Darker Than Any Shadow (2012) and Blood, Ash and Bone (2013). The fourth book in the series — Deeper Than the Grave — releases in November 2014. www.tinawhittle.com

Death in PerspectiveLarissa Reinhart’s best selling Cherry Tucker Mystery series from Henery Press features artist Cherry Tucker: big in mouth, short in stature, and able to sketch a portrait faster than kudzu climbs telephone poles. The first mystery, Portrait of a Dead Guy, was a 2012 Daphne du Maurier finalist, 2012 The Emily Finalist, and 211 Dixie Kane Memorial winner. The series follows with Still Life in Brunswick Stew, 2012 Georgia Author of the Year Nominee Hijack in Abstract, Death in Perspective and the prequel “Quick Sketch” in the mystery anthology, Heartache Motel. The fifth book, The Body in the Landscape, will release June 9, 2015. larissareinhart.com

A Day in the Life with Max Avtaikin by Larissa Reinhart

Death in PerspectiveI am Max Avtaikin, but in certain circles, I am known as the Bear. From the certain country of Eastern Europe, but now American citizen. We think. I much appreciate American history, particularly your Civil War, and so choose to live in your Halo, Georgia. Georgia has the interesting history of rebellion and the cheap property taxes. Also many peoples enjoy the illegal gambling, and I am happy to help them with that. Please don’t tell Cherry Tucker that I continue with the “back room poker,” which is actually in my luxurious basement gaming room. She has the ridiculous ethical dilemma with our friendship. Too much interest in “justice,” I think.

For example, now Cherry Tucker is hired to work at expensive high school for drama director, Terry Tinsley. Tinsley wants Miss Tucker to design his scenery for absurd Romeo and Juliet play, which he has changed to musical with underwater aliens or some such foolishness. Miss Tucker has talent to make the avant garde art, but Tinsley actually wants my Artist to hunt down malicious texter who is cyberbullying faculty at this Peerless Day Academy. The school secretary received poisonous texts and police think she killed herself because of them. Miss Tucker is suspicious creature and doesn’t believe secretary killed herself. Cherry loves to hunt down the criminal. Especially one she thinks has done the murder.

While Miss Tucker has knack for sleuthing, I have knack for making money. And this Tinsley wants my investment in his drama department. So while Cherry spends time at school, painting scenery and hunting for anonymous texter, I am researching this Tinsley for her. His blog, Tinsley Talks, has much — what do you say — smack talk about fellow drama peoples and teachers. Especially the art teacher, Dr. Camille Vail. She and Tinsley have the departmental feud. Cherry finds both characters suspicious, but Cherry has so many suspicions about so much.

At same time as hunting possible texting killer, Cherry Tucker is also hunting her missing brother, Cody. I don’t know this Cody, but he has stolen some damning photos from Cherry’s nemesis, Shawna Branson. These photos implicate Shawna’s father and Cherry’s mother. I do not care about family history, but Cherry cares very much about Halo’s view of longtime family feud between her family and Branson family. Personally, I think because Cherry cares too much for Branson stepson, Deputy Luke Harper. He is police, so I don’t like him. Maybe Cherry is smitten with his good looks. Harper is also assisting her with anonymous texter case. I suspect he is helping her to get back in Cherry’s good graces after their split. The deputy can’t stand her sleuthing and she can’t stand being told “No” or “Stop”.

Personally, Miss Tucker is more interesting when you allow her to chase down the “bad guys.” It is very amusing. However, this time she may be — how do you say — in the deep water over her head. I believe the cyber bully may be more dangerous than she believes. We have an old saying in my country, “Where there is courage, there is victory.” I wish it true for Cherry Tucker’s sake.


You can read more about the Bear in Death in Perspective, the fourth book in the “Cherry Tucker” mystery series, published by Henery Press. The first book in the series is Portrait of a Dead Guy. Books are available at retail and online booksellers.

GIVEAWAY
Comment on this post by 6 p.m. EST on June 26, and you will be entered for a chance to win a copy of DEATH IN PERSPECTIVE. One winner will be chosen at random. Unless specified, U.S. entries only.

Meet the author
After teaching in the US and Japan, Larissa enjoys writing, particularly sassy female characters with a penchant for trouble. She lives near Atlanta with her family and Cairn Terrier, Biscuit. Larissa Reinhart’s third Cherry Tucker book, Hijack in Abstract, is a 50th Annual Georgia Author of the Year Nominee. The first, Portrait of a Dead Guy, was a 2012 Daphne du Maurier finalist for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense, 2012 The Emily finalist, and 2011 Dixie Kane Memorial Winner. Death in Perspective is the fourth book in the best-selling Cherry Tucker Mystery series.

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Death in Perspective by Larissa Reinhart

Death in PerspectiveDeath in Perspective by Larissa Reinhart is the fourth book in the “Cherry Tucker” mystery series. Publisher: Henery Press, June 2014

The curtain rises on Cherry Tucker’s debut as a high school set designer at the posh Peerless Day Academy. Cherry’s been hired for an adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, but the drama director is hoping Cherry can also turn the spotlight on a malicious social media bully who’s sending poisonous texts to the faculty. The director’s got his own drama to hide, and the phantom texter seems eager to spill school secrets. When the principal’s secretary commits suicide, Cherry suspects foul play.

Deputy Luke Harper is ready to return as Cherry’s leading man. He’s eager to assist in finding the phantom culprit, but Cherry fears family secrets may doom them to the role of star-crossed lovers. Offstage, Cherry’s searching for her missing brother whose vendetta might doom Cherry and Deputy Luke Harper as star-crossed lovers. With the bully waiting for a murderous encore and her own family skeletons to hide, Cherry scrambles to find her brother and the mysterious texter before the phantom decides it’s curtains for Cherry and forces her to take a final bow.

I love, love, love this book. Cherry is at it again in her pursuit of justice when her new boss asks her to help expose the identity of the anonymous texter and because Cherry is Cherry, she is determined to prove the recent deaths are in fact, murder.

The author really has a handle on her lead protagonist and it shows in the delivery of this wonderfully designed plot that was hard to put down. The idiosyncrasies of the characters are played out beautifully in the situation that they find themselves and you don’t want to stop for a moment until the drama ends. Cherry is a quirky spitfire that lights the match that sets her little town on fire. With a laugh here and a laugh there, I enjoyed this whodunit and I’m eager to see what happens next in the adventures of Cherry Tucker and the residents of Halo, Georgia.

Cover Reveal of Death In Perspective by Larissa Reinhart

I am so thrilled to reveal the cover for Cherry Tucker’s latest mystery, Death in Perspective, on dru’s book musings! Thank you so much for having me on, Dru Ann!

Death in Perspective

For Cherry’s fourth book, I wanted to write a poison pen mystery, but needed to make it work in a modern setting. Texting and social media seemed like the perfect medium, particularly since social bullying is such a horrific trend in schools. But how to keep such a serious topic light? And how to get the artist Cherry Tucker involved in a social media plot when she can’t even afford texting on her phone? As a long time theater fan and a former high school teacher, I took a look in my wheelhouse and found Cherry a job as a set designer in a high school theater. Not just any high school, a swanky private school with a famous theater department. The theater director and other faculty are being bullied by an anonymous texter. Cherry hates bullies. Throw in a mysterious suicide, an alien musical adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, and an evil art teacher, and Cherry’s found a role typecast just for her.

So, what do you think of the cover? Can you tell it’s a Henery Press cover?

Here’s the preview to Death in Perspective, releasing June 24th, 2014!

In Cherry Tucker’s fourth mystery, the curtain rises on Cherry’s debut as a high school set designer at the posh, private Peerless Day Academy. Cherry’s been hired to design scenery for an avant garde adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, but the theater teacher’s hoping Cherry can also turn the spotlight on a malicious bully who’s sending poisonous texts to the faculty. The director’s got his own drama to hide, and the phantom texter seems eager to spill school secrets. When a school secretary’s death is ruled a suicide, Cherry suspects foul play. The phantom bully may be using blackmail to rid the school of unwanted staff, urging a Montague-Capulet styled showdown.

With Deputy Luke Harper wanting to return as Cherry’s leading man, he’s eager to assist her efforts in fingering the phantom culprit, but Cherry fears family secrets may doom them to the role of star-crossed lovers. Offstage, Cherry’s searching for her missing brother who’s fixed on a vendetta against Luke’s stepfamily, so she instead turns to the local, foreign racketeer, Max Avtaikin, for assistance. With the bully waiting for a murderous encore and her own family skeletons to hide, Cherry scrambles to find her brother and the mysterious texter before the phantom decides its curtains for Cherry and forces her to take a final bow.

GIVEAWAY
For an e-book copy of a Cherry Tucker Mystery (your choice of numbers 1, 2, or 3), I’d love to hear your favorite theater experience. Is there a musical or play that you were in or love to watch? Did you see an adaptation that was so horrible it was funny? Did your preschooler star in a show and refuse to go on stage? I’d love to hear your stories! Contest ends at midnight on March 13, 2014.

About the author
After teaching in the US and Japan, Larissa enjoys writing, particularly sassy female characters with a penchant for trouble. She lives near Atlanta with her family and Cairn Terrier, Biscuit. Visit her website or find her chatting on Facebook. Death in Perspective is the fourth book in the best selling Cherry Tucker Mystery series. The first, Portrait of a Dead Guy (2012), is a Daphne du Maurier finalist, The Emily finalist, and Dixie Kane Memorial winner.


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A Day in the Life of Man-Margret by Austin, Reinhart & Walker

Heartache Motelby Terri L. Austin, Larissa Reinhart, and LynDee Walker

Hey y’all. I’m Man-Margret, seven feet of awesomeness with a bouffant that can scrape the ceiling on my good days. Honey, stop staring at my neck and feast your eyes on my broken heart charm bracelet. Fabulous, no? Since y’all have stopped in at the Heartache Motel here in south metro-Memphis, you probably guessed that this is the place to be if you are a female impersonator with a penchant for the King. Don’t mind the graffiti, boarded windows, or our Christmas tree still standing since 1978. The owners are in the process of renovating this vintage motel. By renovating, I hope they mean tear down and rebuild. And by vintage, I mean they’ve barely replaced a lightbulb since 1982.

Still, for someone of my persuasion and inclination to dress like my favorite Elvis gal, Ann Margret, I fit right in. Just take a gander over at our specialized acts in the Suspicious Minds Lounge, enjoy a Rock-A-Hula cocktail, and rest your weary head in one of our themed rooms. I wouldn’t rest too long, though. Those mattresses will kill your back. Towels are extra, so make sure you pay for them at the front desk. And I don’t recommend using the elevator. But the stairs are standing and we girls could all use a little workout, right?

We also had an unfortunate event right around the holidays. Please don’t think dead bodies are a common occurrence at the Heartache. Accidental deaths, possibly, but not murder. This blonde girl, Rose Strickland, and her adorable blue-haired friend who had the sassiest clothes–I envied those pink lace up boots, something fierce–anyway, they were running around, asking all sorts of questions about it. I shouldn’t say anymore. Management frowns on that type of thing.

We don’t often get honeymoon couples at the Heartache, and when we do they are usually a sorry sight. Just pitiful to think that the happiest night of your life should be spent in the Blue Hawaii suite. I always recommend drinking the complimentary All Shook Up sparkling wine before entering the room. Makes it easier when you take in the de-luxe bathroom with shower. And what might or might not be growing on the shower walls.

Anyway, I was surprised when the most adorable couple showed for the weekend. Little blonde spitfire artist named Cherry Tucker (how could you forget a name like that?) towing a beautiful, Viking-sized poker whiz whose IQ might hover near a coffee table’s, but God love him, who cares? That man could melt the panties off an eskimo. So this Cherry and Todd are on their way to Vegas, but stopping at the Heartache to meet Todd’s cousin who was scammed by some poker pros. Cherry and Todd claim it’s a quicky stopover, but I’ve a feeling they’re looking to win the cousin’s money back. And maybe get even. And by the way he’s looking at her, maybe they’ll want that suite for a honeymoon after all.

I see you brought a dog. Dogs are my new favorite guests, just between us girls. There was a reporter here earlier this week. Brought the most adorable little loud-mouthed pup with her. She got locked in Graceland for the day—the reporter, not the dog. Somebody stole a piece of the King’s heritage. Can you believe that? What is the matter with folks? Anyhoo, this reporter, Nichelle Clarke, chased down her story, but she left the dog upstairs in her room. Pooch kicked up all kinds of fuss. This phone was ringing off the hook with folks complaining. I went up to check it out and brought her back down to entertain her. At the customer’s request, of course. Adorable little thing. Welcome back here anytime. That’s the kind of full service we offer our guests here at the Heartache.

So listen, sugar, are you staying? It’s Christmas Eve, and our Santa Elvis musical revue is the highlight of the whole year. I want a seat down front. You just fill out this card and then take this key on up to the Roustabout suite. But don’t miss the show—it’s a killer.


HEARTACHE MOTEL: Three Interconnected Mystery Novellas
Elvis has left the building, but he’s forever memorialized at the Heartache Motel. Filled with drag queens, Rock-a-Hula cocktails, and a vibrating velveteen bed, these three novellas tell the tales of three amateur sleuths who spend their holidays at the King’s beloved home.

  • Diners Keepers, Losers Weepers by Terri L. Austin
    A Rose Strickland Mystery Novella (follows Diner Impossible)
    When Rose and the gang head to Graceland right before Christmas, they get all shook up: the motel is a seedy dump and an Elvis impersonator turns up dead. Rose discovers missing jewels tie into the death and her suspicious mind flips into overdrive, questioning her fellow guests, the staff, and even a cute impersonator who keeps popping up. Will Rose be able to find the murderer and get home by Christmas day? It’s now or never.
  • Quick Sketch by Larissa Reinhart
    A Cherry Tucker Mystery Novella (prequel to Portrait Of A Dead Guy)
    Sassy Southern artist Cherry Tucker and her poker-loving boyfriend, Todd, pop into Memphis to help Todd’s cousin who’s been hustled out of his savings, right before Christmas. Staying at the shady Heartache Motel, Cherry can’t tell a shill from a mark and fears everyone is playing them for chumps. Cherry and Todd quickly find themselves in a dangerous sting that could send them to the slammer or mark them as pigeons from cons looking for an even bigger score.
  • Dateline Memphis by LynDee Walker
    A Headlines in High Heels Mystery Novella (follows Buried Leads)
    Crime reporter Nichelle Clarke thinks she’s going home for Christmas. But a quick stop at Graceland proves news breaks in the strangest places. When the King’s home gets locked down with Nichelle inside, she chases this headline into the national spotlight—and the thief’s crosshairs. Christmas dreams of blue suede Manolos fade, and all Nichelle wants from Santa is to land the story before the thief cuts off her news feed for good.

Terri, Larissa and LynDee are giving away one (1) digital copy from each of their series for Kindle or Nook only. That’s three lucky winners! Leave a comment to be included in the giveaway. Contest ends December 27.


Meet the authors
After seeing Paper Moon as a child, Larissa Reinhart fell in love with stories about confidence capers. QUICK SKETCH is the Cherry Tucker prequel to PORTRAIT in the mystery anthology THE HEARTACHE MOTEL (December 2013). HIJACK IN ABSTRACT (November 2013) is the third in the Cherry Tucker Mystery Series from Henery Press, following STILL LIFE IN BRUNSWICK STEW (May 2013) and PORTRAIT OF A DEAD GUY, a 2012 Daphne du Maurier finalist. She lives near Atlanta with her minions and Cairn Terrier, Biscuit. Visit her website or find her at on Facebook.

As a girl, Terri L. Austin thought she’d outgrow dreaming up stories and creating imaginary friends. Instead, she’s made a career of it. She met her own Prince Charming and together they live in Missouri. She loves to hear from readers! Terri writes the Rose Strickland Mysteries including DINERS, DIVES, AND DEAD ENDS, LAST DINER STANDING, and DINER IMPOSSIBLE. Visit Terri at her website or on Facebook

LynDee Walker grew up in the land of stifling heat and amazing food most people call Texas, and wanted to be Lois Lane from the time she could say the words “press conference.” An award-winning journalist, she traded cops and deadlines for burp cloths and onesies when her oldest child was born. Writing the Headlines in Heels mysteries gives her the best of both worlds. LynDee adores her family, her readers, and enchiladas. She often works out tricky plot points while walking off the enchiladas. She lives in Richmond, Virginia, where she is working on her next novel. Visit LynDee at her website or on Facebook