Tag Archives: Camille Minichino

A Day in the Life of Postmistress Cassie Miller by Jean Flowers

I’m beginning to think I’ve brought a curse on my hometown.

Before I returned to North Ashcot, Massachusetts as its postmistress, the town was relatively crime free. A few B&Es and a carjacking or two per year, some shoplifting and teen vandalism, all quickly solved. While I’d been building my post office career in Boston, my hometown rolled along peacefully, the loudest noises coming from the soccer field. No screams in the night, no gun shots.

Since I came back, however, the crime rate has soared. I heard someone in line at the post office joke that in our zip code, COD is beginning to mean Cause of Death. Really! I’d deny it, but just a few minutes ago, I heard about a third murder among my friends. Dennis Somerville, physics professor at the local community college and guitarist for The Ashcots, our neighborhood band, has been shot in his home. The artificially pretty lady on the TV news has called it a robbery-gone-bad, but I have this feeling in the pit of my stomach that there’s more to it.

For one thing, Dennis stormed up to my counter yesterday, demanding that I investigate threatening letters he’d received. How I wish I’d paid attention. Instead, I’d invoked the postal service’s official investigative body. As if that were a paragon of speedy justice. For another thing, lately, when I was involved in any way, a crime was never as simple as surprising a thief.

Right after the news, my phone rang and it was my BFF Sunni on the line, Police Chief Sunni Smargon, to most citizens. Another feeling washed over me—that she was about to give me orders to stay out of the Somerville murder case. I was not a sworn police officer, did not have a badge, blah, blah, blah.

I was lucky that the retired postmaster, Ben Gentry, was pining for his old job and only too happy to fill in for me. Which left me free to walk around Dennis’s campus and also casually interview his fellow musicians. I was also lucky that my boyfriend, Quinn Martindale, was a great cook and loved to take over my kitchen, thus freeing me to snoop around and trail suspects, should I be so inclined.

Which I was. And which got me into a bit of trouble, and—maybe—danger. The result was—well, never mind. It’s all written down if you care to read it.

The good news is that I’m fine and back at my job, so I don’t see what all the fuss was about my health and safety in the first place. Will I follow orders the next time? We’ll just have to see.


You can read more about Cassie in Addressed To Kill, the third book in the “Postmistress” mystery series.

Love is in the air for postmaster Cassie Miller and the residents of North Ashcot, Massachusetts. Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, and the town is gearing up for a special dinner dance at the senior center. With the local musical group performing at the dance displaced from their regular practice location, Cassie is all too happy to host them during off-hours at the post office.

But not everything is coming up roses. When one of the musicians, Dennis Somerville, is found shot in his home, rumors swirl over who might have wanted him dead. Cassie must determine if there is a link between a string of recent break-ins and Dennis’s murder before another victim winds up with more than a broken heart.

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About the author
Jean Flowers is one of the pen names of Camille Minichino, a retired physicist turned writer. Camille is the author of twenty-five mystery novels in four series: the Periodic Table Mysteries, the Miniature Mysteries (as Margaret Grace), and the Professor Sophie Knowles Mysteries (as Ada Madison).

All comments are welcomed.

Giveaway: Leave a comment below for your chance to win a print copy of Addressed To Kill. U.S. entries only, please. The giveaway ends July 28, 2017. Good luck everyone!

Cassie Miller, the Postmistress Who Went Home Again by Jean Flowers

Cancelled by MurderEarly risers in North Ashcot, Massachusetts spot me while I’m hoisting the American flag up the pole in front of my post office. My POSTMISTRESS CASSIE MILLER name tag is unnecessary for exchanging greetings as the stars and stripes ascend to the sky over our small town.

“Morning Cassie,” comes from slow-jogging senior citizens. A toot of a horn from a pickup and an SUV driving by. High energy waves from kids on the way to the grade school down the street. I know them all, and they know me.

But before I show up in my dress red-white-and-blues, my day always starts with a quote.

This morning, I peered at the page-a-day calendar and read this, from nineteenth century writer Charles Caleb Colton:

If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village; if you would know, and not be known, live in a city.

I wished I’d written it myself. I’ve certainly thought about it a lot, especially today, on the second anniversary of my return to my home town. I left North Ashcot for college in Boston more than fifteen years ago, and stayed for a career in the Boston postal service.

Postal work itself isn’t that different, whether you’re in a big central office or a small one-woman operation. So many services are online now, from buying stamps and scheduling a pickup, to reserving a post office box. But the postal worker’s brick and mortar job everywhere is still face-to-face customer service and the promise to handle business and personal dispatches with the care she would give her own correspondence.

What’s different for me is where I honor my commitment these days.

Growing up in North Ashcot, it was impossible to skip school—or make a mistake—without everyone and his parents’ knowing it within a few hours. There wasn’t a lot to do—nor much to “know”—unless you count bake-offs, drag racing on Main Street, and Founder’s Day parades. When my parents died in a car crash during my junior year in high school, it seemed necessary for me to leave also, to go where no one knew me or brought casseroles to cheer me up.

The plan worked. If you would know, and not be known, live in a city.

My days in Boston were filled with things to know—after work in the bustling main post office, there was more to do than could fit in one day. If we were in a sporting mood, my friends and I could cheer the Red Sox; if we needed a cultural fix, we could choose among scores of museums and concert halls; if we wanted music to listen or dance to, there was a club on every corner.

North Ashcot has a small park behind city hall; Boston has a 281-acre world-class arboretum. North Ashcot has a monument to Revolutionary War hero, General Henry Knox; Boston has a two-and-a-half-mile-long Freedom Trail with 16 locations significant to early US history.

In Boston, I could walk down the street and never meet someone only one degree of separation from my family or best friend. No one stopped me to ask, “How’s your Aunt Tess’s bad knee?” or “Did you find those earrings you were looking for?”

So, why did I come back to this village? I asked myself this morning. Back to where I was known, but there was nothing much to know.

Could I have predicted that I’d find satisfaction in learning to quilt from the chief of police (with 3 officers under her, as opposed to Boston’s nearly 3000-person force)? More important, could I have predicted that I would become engaged in helping said chief of police in her investigations?

This week it was about my friend Daisy who died during one of our famous summer hurricanes. It was a falling tree branch that killed her. Or was it? I couldn’t seem to keep my nose out of the chief’s business. If I were still in Boston, I told myself, I wouldn’t dare interfere in police business. But then, I probably wouldn’t have known the victim, and she wouldn’t have known me.

So, I asked myself this morning. Village or City?

For now, it’s Village.

[Note from North Ashcot Chief of Police Sunni Smargon: I’ve given up trying to dissuade Postmistress Cassie Miller from interfering with my job. I’m thinking of giving her a badge instead. ]

[Note from Jean Flowers: For the full story of Daisy Harmon’s death, read Cancelled by Death, recently released on September 6, 2016!]


Cancelled by Death is the second book in the Postmistress mystery series, published by Penguin Random House, September 2016.

Cassie Miller returned to her sleepy hometown in the Berkshires to start over as the new postmistress. But she soon finds that dead letters are nothing compared to murder victims. . .

With a massive storm about to hit North Ashcot, Massachusetts, threatening floods and widespread wind damage, Cassie is forced to close up the post office along with the rest of the local business owners and residents, who are battening down the hatches and bracing themselves for the worst.

Although the storm proves not to be as bad as predicted, fabric shop owner Daisy Harmon is found dead, seemingly killed by a fallen branch. But the police quickly determine that her death had nothing to do with foul weather and everything to do with foul play. After Daisy’s widowed husband approaches her to help solve his wife’s murder, Cassie vows to find the killer before another innocent victim is taken by storm.

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About the author
Jean Flowers is the pen name of Camille Minichino, the author of short stories, articles, and more than twenty CMedgarmystery novels. They include the Postmistress series, the Professor Sophie Knowles Mysteries (as Ada Madison), and the Miniature series (as Margaret Grace). She’s past president of Northern California MWA, Northern California Sisters in Crime, and the Mt. Diablo California Writers Club. She teaches science at Golden Gate University, and writing at Bay Area schools. Connect with Camille at www.minichino.com.

All comments are welcomed.

Giveaway: Leave a comment below for your chance to win a print copy of Cancelled by Death. US entries only, please. The giveaway will end September 17, 2016 at 12 AM (midnight) EST. Good luck everyone!

Maddie’s Day in the Life with Grandma Gerry Porter by Margaret Grace

Matrimony in MiniatureI’m Maddie Porter. I’m 11 and 3/4, and my grandma is Gerry Porter.

People are asking Grandma to talk about a day in her life. But she’s very shy when it comes to talking about herself. She taught high school for years and years, but she claims that’s different. She knows a lot about English—that means all kinds of reading and writing, like, even old stuff, Shakespeare, and all—and she loves to pass it on, she says. But if it’s about her personal life, she keeps it quiet.

So it’s up to me to do it for her. Talk about her day, I mean.

When I was a kid, I didn’t spend as much time with Grandma and Grandpa because I lived far away in Los Angeles. But now I live in Palo Alto, California, which is very close to Lincoln Point and I have my own bedroom in Grandma’s house. Grandpa was sick for a long time and then he died but I still remember a little bit about him. He was an architect and that’s what I might want to be. Either that, or I’ll get a job building dollhouses because that’s my favorite thing to do with Grandma. She has lots of friends and they come over and work on projects that they give away. Like to kids in shelters. I guess that means that they can’t afford real homes. The kids, I mean.

I’m very lucky that I have 2 homes, almost. My best friend in Lincoln Point is Taylor. Taylor’s grandpa, Henry, and my grandma are going to get married soon.

Or else, I might be a cop, like my first-cousin-once-removed Skip, but I can tell nobody wants me to do that, because . . .

Uh-oh, I think I’m doing that unfocused thing my teachers are always ragging on me about. I’m supposed to be talking about a day in Grandma’s life. But I only know about the days I’m with her, so what can I do?

Maybe I’ll just tell you about last Saturday, even though it was the worst day of my life. I did something really stupid and Grandma got mad at me. And she never gets mad, even when my ‘rents are really mad at me, so you know it must have been bad.

I’ll try to explain why it happened. I was at soccer practice with Taylor and when Henry took us back to Grandma’s house she was all upset. The place where their wedding was going to be, I forget her name, called and said someone died in their pool! Then it turned out the dead person was Grandma’s friend Mr. Templeton’s wife! He’s part of Grandma’s group that comes and builds dollhouses with us.

The second best thing I like to do, well maybe it’s the first, is help my cousin Skip solve cases like this. I know a lot about computers and I might be a computer specialist when I get to college. It’s hard to decide.

So, everyone’s trying to figure out why Mrs. Templeton, the dead lady, was even at the place where Grandma and Henry were going to get married, plus who pushed her into the pool? It’s like a hotel but they call it Bee and Bee, I think. I don’t know why.

Why Grandma was mad at me: I had an idea for how to find out something about one of the suspects. I was only trying to help, but it turned out to be not a good idea because I could have gotten hurt and some other people might have gotten hurt, too.

I don’t have time to explain it all, but I just wanted to tell you about that one day in Grandma’s life when I thought she didn’t love me anymore. Everything’s okay now, though. The end.

[Note from Gerry: Maddie wants me to correct her essay before she submits it, but I’m leaving it as is. I’m not even going to read it. I hope she didn’t reveal too many family secrets!]

[Note from Margaret Grace: For the full story of Maddie’s misbehavior, read Matrimony in Miniature, recently released on September 9, 2016!]


Matrimony in Miniature is the 9th book in the Miniature mystery series, published by Perseverance Press, September 2016.

When murder happens in the small town of Lincoln Point CA, there aren’t many degrees of separation between the victim and retired teacher Gerry Porter. How can she stay away from the investigation when the crime scene is the venue for her marriage to Henry Baker? But this time, nephew Detective Skip Gowen tries to discourage Gerry’s and granddaughter Maddie’s efforts to solve “The Case.” He couldn’t live with himself if the murderer learns of their efforts and comes after them. . .

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About the author
Margaret Grace is the pen name of Camille Minichino, the author of short stories, articles, and more than twenty CMedgarmystery novels. They include the Miniature series, the Professor Sophie Knowles Mysteries (as Ada Madison), and the new Postmistress series (as Jean Flowers). She’s past president of Northern California MWA, Northern California Sisters in Crime, and the Mt. Diablo California Writers Club. She teaches science at Golden Gate University, and writing at Bay Area schools. Connect with Camille at www.minichino.com.

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All comments are welcomed.

Sleuthing Women: 10 First-in-Series Mysteries edited by Lois Winston

sleuthing women

Being a mystery author, I know quite a few other mystery authors. However, there are many I don’t know and haven’t read. I began to wonder how many wonderful mysteries I’m missing out on because I just don’t know about them. And then I wondered, how many readers don’t know about my books? Or the books I’ve enjoyed by some of my fellow authors? What if there was an easy way to introduce mystery readers to some of my favorite authors and their series? That’s when inspiration hit, and I began contacting some of my mystery author friends. They loved my idea and joined me in producing Sleuthing Women: 10 First-in-Series Mysteries.

Sleuthing Women: 10 First-in-Series Mysteries is a collection of full-length mysteries featuring murder and assorted mayhem by ten critically acclaimed, award-winning, and bestselling authors. Each novel in the set is the first book in an established multi-book series—a total of over 3,000 pages of reading pleasure for lovers of amateur sleuth, caper, and cozy mysteries, with a combined total of over 1700 reviews on Amazon, averaging 4 stars. Titles include:

Assault With a Deadly Glue Gun, an Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mystery by Lois Winston—Working mom Anastasia is clueless about her husband’s gambling addiction until he permanently cashes in his chips and her comfortable middle-class life craps out. He leaves her with staggering debt, his communist mother, and a loan shark demanding $50,000. Then she’s accused of murder. . .

Murder Among Neighbors, a Kate Austen Suburban Mystery by Jonnie Jacobs — When Kate Austen’s socialite neighbor, Pepper Livingston, is murdered, Kate becomes involved in a sea of steamy secrets that bring her face to face with shocking truths—and handsome detective Michael Stone.

Skeleton in a Dead Space, a Kelly O’Connell Mystery by Judy Alter—Real estate isn’t a dangerous profession until Kelly O’Connell stumbles over a skeleton and runs into serial killers and cold-blooded murderers in a home being renovated in Fort Worth. Kelly barges through life trying to keep from angering her policeman boyfriend Mike and protect her two young daughters.

In for a Penny, a Cleopatra Jones Mystery by Maggie Toussaint—Accountant Cleo faces an unwanted hazard when her golf ball lands on a dead banker. The cops think her BFF shot him, so Cleo sets out to prove them wrong. She ventures into the dating world, wrangles her teens, adopts the victim’s dog, and tries to rein in her mom. . .until the killer puts a target on Cleo’s back.

The Hydrogen Murder, a Periodic Table Mystery by Camille Minichino—A retired physicist returns to her hometown of Revere, Massachusetts and moves into an apartment above her friends’ funeral home. When she signs on to help the Police Department with a science-related homicide, she doesn’t realize she may have hundreds of cases ahead of her.

Retirement Can Be Murder, A Baby Boomer Mystery by Susan Santangelo—Carol Andrews dreads her husband Jim’s upcoming retirement more than a root canal without Novocain. She can’t imagine anything worse than having an at-home husband with time on his hands and nothing to fill it—until Jim is suspected of murdering his retirement coach.

Dead Air, A Talk Radio Mystery by Mary Kennedy—Psychologist Maggie Walsh moves from NY to Florida to become the host of WYME’s On the Couch with Maggie Walsh. When her guest, New Age prophet Guru Sanjay Gingii, turns up dead, her new roommate Lark becomes the prime suspect. Maggie must prove Lark innocent while dealing with a killer who needs more than just therapy.

A Dead Red Cadillac, A Dead Red Mystery by RP Dahlke—When her vintage Cadillac is found tail-fins up in a nearby lake, the police ask aero-ag pilot Lalla Bains why an elderly widowed piano teacher is found strapped in the driver’s seat. Lalla confronts suspects, informants, cross-dressers, drug-running crop dusters, and a crazy Chihuahua on her quest to find the killer.

Murder is a Family Business, an Alvarez Family Murder Mystery by Heather Haven—Just because a man cheats on his wife and makes Danny DeVito look tall, dark and handsome, is that any reason to kill him? The reluctant and quirky PI, Lee Alvarez, has her work cut out for her when the man is murdered on her watch. Of all the nerve.

Murder, Honey, a Carol Sabala Mystery by Vinnie Hansen—When the head chef collapses into baker Carol Sabala’s cookie dough, she is thrust into her first murder investigation. Suspects abound at Archibald’s, the swanky Santa Cruz restaurant where Carol works. The head chef cut a swath of people who wanted him dead from ex-lovers to bitter rivals to greedy relatives.


I hope I’ve piqued your curiosity with these short blurbs, and you’ll soon find some new favorite authors in Sleuthing Women: 10 First-in-Series Mysteries. The boxed set e-book is available through Amazon Kindle, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo, and iTunes.

About Lois Winston
USA Today bestselling and award-winning author Lois Winston writes mystery, romance, romantic suspense, chick lit, women’s fiction, children’s chapter books, and nonfiction under her own name and her Emma lois-winston-med-res-fileCarlyle pen name. Kirkus Reviews dubbed her critically acclaimed Anastasia Pollack Crafting Mystery series, “North Jersey’s more mature answer to Stephanie Plum.” In addition, Lois is an award-winning craft and needlework designer who often draws much of her source material for both her characters and plots from her experiences in the crafts industry. Visit Lois/Emma at www.loiswinston.com and Anastasia at the Killer Crafts & Crafty Killers blog. Follow her on Pinterest, and on Twitter. Sign up for her newsletter here.

Giveaway: Leave comment below for your chance to win a Kindle version of Sleuthing Women: 10 First-in-Series Mysteries. The giveaway will end May 6, 2016 at 12 AM EST. Good luck everyone!

All comments are welcomed.

Meet Postmaster Cassie Miller by Jean Flowers

Death Takes PriorityI’m thrilled to be back in my hometown of North Ashcot, Massachusetts. It’s a small enough town that we all know each other, but big enough to have its own post office. And if there’s one thing I love, it’s the US Postal Service!

I’ve been a fan of the USPS since I was a kid, sitting on my porch, waiting for the mailman, crossing my fingers that there would something with my name on it. I’d send away for things, just to receive letters or packages addressed to me. I ordered free information kits for home improvement, pamphlets on family health, brochures for colleges and universities all over the world. All before I was in junior high. One time I sent in a request for information on becoming an airline flight attendant. They responded immediately, never asking my age. I took the package to school and impressed all my friends.

Looking back, I figure I needed something to affirm my rightful place in the busy world I lived in. If I was on the mail route, I mattered. If someone sent me mail, I existed, even if I ordered the mail myself.

I saved everything the mail carriers delivered in a special box that I covered with colored adhesive paper. Now and then I’d pull the box from under my bed and go through the treasures: a flyer advertising the flea market in the school parking lot on Saturdays; information about life insurance that was secure and affordable; a catalog of new toys from a big store across the ocean in London (my father explained the meaning of the funny L that was like the dollar sign in the United States).

Now, at thirty-five years old, I no longer have to wish for mail. I have my dream job—I’m Postmaster Cassie Miller. Every day I raise the flag outside the front door of the post office and take on the awesome responsibility of handling every citizen’s mail. All the correspondence of North Ashcot’s three thousand citizens passes through me. Birthday greetings and sympathy cards. Packages to friends and relatives all over the world. Letters of complaint and Get Well Soon messages. I see them all and stamp them to get them started on their way or accept them and distribute them to our citizens.

I have tales to tell, and I’ve gotten started with my first book, DEATH TAKES PRIORITY. I’m going to order my own copy through the US mail!


You can read more about Cassie in Death Takes Priority, the first book in the NEW “Postmistress” mystery series, published by Berkley Prime Crime.

About Death Takes Priority

Introducing a murder mystery that really delivers!

After caring for her dying aunt and being dumped by her fiancé, Cassie Miller decides to return to her small hometown in the Berkshires to lick her wounds and live in the house where she was raised. Leaving behind her managerial position in the Boston main postal office, Cassie trades in her tailored suits and high heels for the comfortable blue shirt and red, white, and blue striped scarf of the Postmaster for North Ashcot, Massachusetts.

Everything is business as usual until Cassie arrives at work one day to find that someone has broken into the post office building. The only items stolen: stacks of telephone books. Who steals phone books? Two days later, the body of an unidentified man is found in the woods. And when the handsome antiques dealer she just had lunch with is taken into custody, Cassie is suddenly drawn into the case. With a crime enveloped in mystery, she needs to track the killer—before another victim’s fate is sealed in the dead letter office. . .

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GIVEAWAY: Leave a comment by 12 a.m. eastern on Tuesday, November 10 for your chance to win a print copy of Death Takes Priority. (US entries only, please.) Good luck everyone!

About the author
Camille Minichino (aka Margaret Grace, Ada Madison, and Jean Flowers) has written more than 20 cozy mystery novels in four series, plus short stories and articles. Latest release: Death Takes Priority, the first in the Postmistress Mysteries. A retired physicist, she loves writing, but misses her helium-neon laser. Visit Camille at www.minichino.com.

My Musing ~ Death Takes Priority by Jean Flowers

Death Takes PriorityDeath Takes Priority by Jean Flowers is the first book in the NEW “Postmistress” mystery series. Publisher: Berkley Prime Crime, November 2015

After caring for her dying aunt and being dumped by her fiancé, Cassie Miller decides to return to her small hometown in the Berkshires to lick her wounds and live in the house where she was raised. Leaving behind her managerial position in the Boston main postal office, Cassie trades in her tailored suits and high heels for the comfortable blue shirt and red, white, and blue striped scarf of the Postmaster for North Ashcot, Massachusetts.

Everything is business as usual until Cassie arrives at work one day to find that someone has broken into the post office building. The only items stolen: stacks of telephone books. Who steals phone books? Two days later, the body of an unidentified man is found in the woods. And when the handsome antiques dealer she just had lunch with is taken into custody, Cassie is suddenly drawn into the case. With a crime enveloped in mystery, she needs to track the killer—before another victim’s fate is sealed in the dead letter office.

This was a very enjoyable fresh new cozy that is well written with a nice pace that is easy to follow. The mystery kept me intrigued as the author deftly presented this tale in a manner that pulled me into this action-packed story that had some twists and turns that enhanced the telling of this story. It was fun meeting and getting to know all the pertinent characters that comprises the residents of North Ashcot that included our heroine, postmaster Cassie, police chief Sunni, semi-retired Ben, to name a few. I enjoyed the small town atmosphere and the friendliness of the people that was met along the way to solving a crime with surprising results. This is a welcome addition to the cozy genre and I look forward to reading more stories with Cassie and the gang.

Jean Flowers is the pseudonym of Camille Minichino

Sophie Knowles And Then There Were Four by Ada Madison

Quotient of MurderGerry Porter put down her glue gun and slid her phone open. The ringtone stopped and she greeted her friend, the only college math professor she knew.

“Hey, Sophie. Meant to call you. Congratulations on the new book. How are the sales?”

“Thanks, but who knows how The Quotient of Murder is doing? They never give you actual figures.”

“I know that bothers you, being a numbers person and all.”

“It’s not just that, look at how hard we work for Ada Madison.”

“You mean Margaret Grace.”

“Yeah, yeah, and Camille Minichino. Whoever. Wonder who she is this month?”

Gerry heard a sniffle. Was Sophie crying? “What’s wrong, Soph?”

“All my work, and I think she’s going to dump me. Four books and I’m out.”

“What? What makes you think that?”

“I heard her talking on the phone with her New York editor. She didn’t know she’d opened up the .doc for the last book featuring”— sniff—”me, so I could hear everything.”

Gerry wasn’t prepared for this. She wasn’t much good with personal relationships. She was okay in a crisis if a murder was involved, but otherwise not. “Let’s get Gloria Lamerino on the line,” she suggested.

Another sniff. “Okay,” Sophie said. “She’ll know how I feel. She was dumped a long time ago and she’s doing okay.”

Gerry was the least techie of the three women friends, so she had to enlist her granddaughter, Maddie, to work out the details of getting Gloria on the line for a three-way.

“Hello, everyone. What’s up?” Gloria asked. “I’ve been napping for a few years.”

“That’s what I wanted to talk to you about,” Sophie said. “What happens when your series gets dumped?”

“They don’t call it ‘dumping’,” Gloria said. “They just avoid mentioning another contract, and move on.”

“But I have unfinished plot threads,” Sophie said. “I have puzzles ready to submit to magazines, and Bruce and I aren’t even engaged yet. There’s so much more life in us.”

Gloria clicked her tongue. “I know how you feel. There were more than 100 elements to go in the periodic table. I was all geared up for The Neon Murder, where a motel manager was going to be murdered over his tacky neon orange sign. But in the end, it’s the sales numbers that matter and there’s nothing you can do.”

Gerry took a sip of her iced tea and a bite of her famous ginger cookies. She was the lucky one, since Margaret Grace, her author, found another publisher for her. Gerry was still thriving and having great adventures in New York City in the 8th book of the series.

“I wasn’t as lucky as Gerry,” Gloria admitted. “Camille took me out for a ride in a short story, The Fluorine Murder, and promised my fans she’d write more stories based on the elements, but so far, she hasn’t come through.”

“She was busy with me and Gerry,” Sophie said. “But now I’m history.”

“She did put The Hydrogen Murder online as an e-book and I have fun watching new people read about that first adventure,” Gloria offered.

“So that’s what it might come to?” Sophie asked. “Like watching Law & Order reruns on TV.”

“Or, worse, Monk reruns,” Gloria said.

“Shh, wait,” Gerry said. “Do I hear clicking noises on the line? Is someone else trying to join us?”

“Hello? Hello?” A woman’s voice, soft and hesitant came through.

“Is that someone new?” Gerry asked.

“Are there four of us now?” Sophie asked.

“Don’t tell me,” Gloria said. “A fourth series is on the way?”

“Hello?” the strange new woman said. “My name is—”

Gloria, Gerry, and Sophie strained to hear.

But the line clicked off.


You can read more about Sophie in The Quotient of Murder, the second book in the “Professor Sophie Knowles” mystery series, published by Berkley Prime Crime. The first book in the series is The Square Root of Murder. Books are available at retail and online booksellers.


Thanks to Penguin, I have one (1) copy of “The Quotient of Murder” to give away. Leave a comment to be included in the giveaway. Contest ends November 14; US entries only per publisher’s request.


Meet the author
Camille Minichino is the author of 18 mysteries in three series: The Periodic Table Mysteries, The Miniature Mysteries (as Margaret Grace) and the Professor Sophie Knowles Mysteries (as Ada Madison). The Quotient of Murder is due from Berkley Prime Crime November 5, 2013. Visit her website: minichino.com.